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Course 5B: Digital evidence and cybercrime investigation, Elective topic, 15 credits (ETCS)

This course is divided into three parts: Cybercrime as a phenomena, the importance of digital evidence during investigations and transnational investigations.

Cybercrime as a phenomena

This part will provide insight into different types of cybercrime, future trends and challenges and appraisal relative to traditional computer forensics. Further, there will be an introduction to both technical and legal terminology related to cybercrime.

Knowledge

At the end of this part, the students have thorough knowledge of:

  • The most usual types of cybercrime
  • Distinction between cybercrime and computer crime
  • The most important investigative measures typical for cybercrime cases
  • Seizure of digital evidence and computer forensic methodology
  • National and international legislation relevant for cybercrime investigations

Skills

At the end of this part, the students are able to:

  • Identify different categories of cybercrime
  • Distinguish between cybercrime and other types of crime
  • Utilise different investigative measures applicable to cybercrime
  • Assess the potential and limitations  given by legislation

The significance of digital evidence during investigations

Most cases today have some elements of digital evidence. It is important to understand how significant this type of evidence could be for an investigation.

Knowledge

At the end of this part, the students have deep knowledge in:

  • Different categories of digital evidence
  • Procedures for obtaining digital evidence. 

Skills

At the end of this part, the students are able to:

  • Identify different categories of digital evidence
  • Assess the importance of digital in different cases
  • Identify, seize, assess and utilise digital evidence while processing cases

Transnational investigations

In many cases involving cybercrime and digital evidence, it might be necessary to relate to other countries and other legislations. In this part of the course, the student will be given an overview of legal, social and technical impact cybercrime might have on society.

Knowledge 

At the end of this part, the students have deep knowledge in:

  • Transnational cybercrime legislation
  • Established networks and other channels for cooperation and fight against cybercrime

Skills

At the end of this part, the students are able to:

  • Assess if a criminal case would have to rely upon the legislation of another country
  • Follow correct procedure while applying for transnational assistance

Coursework 

The following coursework must be passed before students are allowed to sit for the exam:

  • An individual term paper (up to 3000 word)
  • A final reflection essay (up to 1200)

Assessment

The course is ended by a two-day individual home exam based on a criminal case (up to 3000 words). Grading will be A to E for those who pass the exam and F for those who fail the exam.

Literature

Equivalent to 900 pages, approximately.

See the curriculum (PDF)

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